Friday, August 25, 2006

Mai Hiam or Mai Hump?

How come ST report "mee siam mai hiam" instead of "mee siam mai hump"?

It is clear that PM Lee said "Mee siam mai hump".

Could this be an attempt to the cover up for PM Lee or yet another "honest mistake" by our "nation building press"?

Anyway this isn't the 1st time that "incidents" of this sort happened.

Check out the 2 different version of quote on PM Lee's fix opposition and buy votes statement below.

I REALLY hope that ST isn't spreading "half-truths and untruths" to mislead Singaporeans. :P

Added:

Still think PM Lee's slip is a harmless mistake? Check this out!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aug 21, 2006
DIGITAL AGE

Govt will podcast too but politics to be kept serious
Pervasive electronic media will not only open up new opportunities but also change the texture of society and create new problems which need to be managed

By Lydia Lim

...

He said that the Government would also update its laws when necessary and cited two examples: changes made earlier this year to regulations on podcasts during elections, and a 1998 change to the Films Act banning the making of political videos.

Mr Lee also made clear that at stake is not just fun and entertainment but a serious decision which the Government has to make about how far it wants to go in adapting to the new media and what tone it wants to set.

He warned that if politicians were to start competing on the basis of whose podcast was funnier, the tone of public debate would be lowered and there would be a 'race to the bottom', as had happened in countries with unrestrained media like the Philippines and Taiwan.

'You talk about bak chor mee, I will say mee siam mai hiam [Emphasis added],' he said, citing examples of possible podcasts named after popular local dishes.

'Then we compete...I will hire Jack Neo to be my National Day Rally adviser. It'll be a fun time, we will enjoy thoroughly, go home totally entertained. But is this the way to deal with serious issues?' he asked.

Mr Lee also said that while he welcomed citizens speaking up on issues, they should temper passion with reason.

'It's good to be passionate, to care enough about what's happening in the country, to want to fight for what you believe in, not just say something, better still, do something.

'But passion and emotions must also be balanced by logic, thinking, calmness and wisdom. There's no point just working people up, running down institutions because in the end you make our problems harder, not easier to solve. It leads nowhere.'

Mr Lee said that debate was necessary to work out solutions but these must be 'for the larger good and the longer term'.

While riding the digital wave would bring its share of risks, Mr Lee was clear on this point: 'We have to keep on moving forward, open up.'

The Government does not have all the answers or know all the risks and is feeling its way forward step by step, he said.

With this opening up, there would also come differences of view.

'You don't want everybody to be singing the same note but...if we are playing music, we should be playing jazz and improvising, each playing different things but it blends together and it's a Singapore tone, a Singapore tune and Singapore moves forward.

'That's the way we should be in the digital age,' he said.

lydia@sph.com.sg


May 5, 2006
WP attacks PM over comments on opposition

...

He said: 'Instead of spending my time thinking of what is the right policy for Singapore, I have to spend all my time thinking what is the right way to fix them, what's the right way to buy my own supporters over [Emphasis added], how can I solve this week's problem and forget about next year's challenges.' ...


PM Lee says countries worldwide respect and admire Singapore's proven system
By Sharon Tong/S. Ramesh, Channel NewsAsia | Posted: 03 May 2006 1839 hrs

...

"Right now we have Low Thia Khiang, Chiam See Tong, Steve Chia. We can deal with them. Suppose you had 10, 15, 20 opposition members in Parliament. Instead of spending my time thinking what is the right policy for Singapore, I'm going to spend all my time thinking what's the right way to fix them, to buy my supporters votes [Emphasis added], how can I solve this week's problem and forget about next year's challenges?" ...

1 Comments:

At 4:06 AM, January 06, 2010, Anonymous Anonymous said...

[URL="http://info.channelnewsasia.com/ge/video.htm"]All election videos[/URL]

[URL="http://video2.channelnewsasia.com/cnavideos/cnaplayer.asp?skin=player1.swf&filename=pmlunchrally.flv"]PM Lee says countries worldwide respect and admire Singapore's proven
system[/URL]





PM Lee says countries worldwide respect and admire Singapore's proven
system
03 May 2006 1839 hrs (SST)
http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/206313/1/.html

SINGAPORE : Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong says Singapore is at the top
of its game because of a strong political system and quality
leadership.

Speaking at the first lunchtime election rally in Singapore in nine
years, Mr Lee says the PAP has a proven system that works.

He says countries the world over respect and admire Singapore's system.


Mr Lee says what the PAP wants for Singapore is something special and
precious that's worth fighting for.

So Singaporeans must put their hearts and souls into working together
as a team to realise and create this special Singapore.

Raffles Place - in the heart of Singapore's financial district - was
the venue of the election's first lunchtime rally.

Lunchtime rallies, which were absent in the last General Election, have
made a comeback this year.

The target is to reach out to the professionals, managers, executives
and businessmen.

Nine PAP candidates took to the stage to explain the importance of
maintaining good policies and programmes for Singapore, and why the PAP
is the right party to deliver the right essentials.

Mr Lee says: "Deep capabilities in our population, in our government,
in our leadership and deep values in our people to understand, to
support, to work together, to make it work. Our system is different,
it's good, it's good for Singapore and it works."

He says some Singaporeans want a more open, multi-party system.

Mr Lee says the opposition parties are capitalising on this by asking
for their votes, not because of their abilities or policies, but
because then, the opposition would exist.

But he questioned if this would make things better for Singapore.

Mr Lee says: "What is the opposition's job? It's not to help the PAP do
a better job ... because if they help the PAP do a better job, you're
going to vote for me again and they're going to be out of a job for a
long time. So their job is to make life miserable for me.

"Right now we have Low Thia Khiang, Chiam See Tong, Steve Chia. We can
deal with them. Suppose you had 10, 15, 20 opposition members in
Parliament. Instead of spending my time thinking what is the right
policy for Singapore, I'm going to spend all my time thinking what's
the right way to fix them, to buy my supporters votes, how can I solve
this week's problem and forget about next year's challenges?"

Mr Lee says while any Singaporean can enter politics, the quality
needed to get elected must be very high.

He says this is why the PAP has assembled a strong, national team with
a long term view - one that would work together and fight to realise
its vision for Singapore.

At the rally, Mr Lee also named four potential office bearers, whom he
will appoint after the elections.

They are Grace Fu, Lee Yi Shyan, Masagos Zulkifli and Lui Tuck Yew.

Mr Lee says if they are elected, they will be appointed parliamentary
secretaries and ministers of state, adding that some of them have
potential to go higher.

He described them as "big people with broad shoulders" who could deal
with big issues and would serve the people well.

As to whether there would be more office-holders, Mr Lee says only time
will tell as he learns more about the new candidates and their
abilities.

Earlier, Mr Lee says he is especially proud of the bicultural
candidates - those who are equally comfortable speaking Chinese and
English, like former IE Singapore CEO Lee Yi Shyan. - CNA/de

 

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